Saturday, July 7, 2012

Canning Corn

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Updated July 2019

I almost always get great deals on fresh corn from some of the wonderful farmers at my local farmers markets.


During the growing season, you will find me there most Friday's and Saturday's buying all kinds of fresh veggies and produce. My family and I have a favorite Bi-Color Corn we love, so that's what I was after one summer day.


Ok, so let's get started. First you will need to shuck your corn and remove all the silk. Blanch cobs in boiling water 3 minutes, and immediately plunge into an ice bath (fill your sink with ice and a bit of water).

Next, remove the kernels from cob. A sharp knife will work (do this over a bundt pan or tube pan and all the kernels will go into the pan and not all over your counter top). 


Doesn't that look pretty?


You may also like:
Roasted Corn Salad
Potato, Corn and Bacon Chowder

RECIPE
ingredients
An average of 31½ pounds (in husk) of sweet corn is needed per canner load of 7 quarts or 14 pints; an average of 20 pounds is needed per canner load of 9 pints. A bushel weighs 35 pounds and yields 6 to 11 quarts – an average of 4½ pounds per quart.
Salt (optional)

Method
Shuck your corn and remove all the silk. Blanch cobs in boiling water 3 minutes, and immediately plunge into an ice bath (fill your sink with ice and a bit of water).

Remove the kernels from cob. A sharp knife will work (do this over a bundt pan or tube pan and all the kernels will go into the pan and not all over your counter top).

Fill your jars with the corn kernels leaving 1-inch head-space, top with hot water and add 1/2 tsp salt per pint or 1 tsp salt per quart jar (if desired, salt is optional) maintaining 1-inch head-space.

Process pints 55 minutes and quarts 85 minutes in a pressure canner at 11 lbs. pressure.

See complete directions here from the National Center for Home Food Preservation: Corn

Now you're ready to eat some of summer's goodness year 'round! Store in your pantry for up to one year.

Cook's note - I find the texture of the canned corn stays the most like fresh using this process, and tastes the closest to fresh. Use in any recipe calling for a can (pint) or 2 cups of corn.


Enjoy,
Mary

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